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  • 1245 N. Garfield Avenue

    Pasadena, CA 91104
  • Status: Sold
    Year Built: 1892
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  • The Gilmore House: Pasadena’s “Crown Rose”
  • Sold for: $579,000
    Offered at: $579,000

MLS Number: 2215596

  • Architect-designed
  • Balcony
  • Deck
  • Fireplace
  • Hardwood floors
  • High ceilings
  • Oversized lot

I have successfully marketed and sold this famous Victorian landmark, the Gilmore House. Known as the "Crown Rose" this is one of the finest homes of its age remaining in Pasadena. Seven bedrooms (or five or six plus den and extra room), there is also the attic which is a wonderful contemporary space, ideal for a home office.

In 1891, Quincy Adams Gilmore engaged the partnership of Roehrig & Locke to design this home for his family. Gilmore (1825-1900), a prominent Pasadena citizen and businessman, moved to Southern California in the 1880s and was known for his integrity and acumen, kindness, and depth of thought and caring. Since the turn of the century, few changes have been made to the home. The south porch was added in 1907, and some remodeling has taken place over the years. But it stands largely unchanged in tribute to its first owners.

Frederick Louis Roehrig and Seymour Locke formed their partnership just before designing this home. Roehrig is perhaps best known for the Green Hotel, but also is responsible for many well-known residences in the area, as well as numerous churches and commercial structures.

The Neoclassical design is a departure from the popular style of the time, more open and light than most of its contemporaries. Ornament is restrained, detailed yet refined. The use of natural wood finish has survived for over a hundred years.

The floor plan is eminently livable, even a century after its design. With up to seven bedrooms (some may be counted as sitting rooms or work rooms, studios or an office), window seats, nooks, crannies and details large and small, it is a magnificent example of the 19th Century building arts which is still functional today.